Get up to speed on food allergy

Get up to speed on food allergy

Did you know severe eczema may be a sign of food allergy in young babies? Food allergies usually occur soon after eating the food or within two hours. According to Allergy and Anaphylaxis Australia, some babies can be sensitised to a food protein through breast milk or creams that contain food allergens such as nuts, oils, milk or egg.
 
The most serious symptoms of food allergy (anaphylaxis) are breathing difficulties and/or a sudden drop in blood pressure. Your infant may appear pale and floppy. This severe reaction can be life threatening. Follow emergency procedures (scroll down to see what to do in an emergency) then dial 000 immediately for an ambulance.

Read More

Australia's allergy crisis: Know the risk and how to protect your kids

Australia's allergy crisis: Know the risk and how to protect your kids

With childhood allergy rapidly on the rise in Australia, managing allergies and making the right decision in an emergency can be a challenge for parents, grandparents, babysitters, teachers and other carers.
 
It’s estimated 40 per cent of children will be affected by some kind of allergy. Currently there is no cure for allergies, and research is now aimed at finding ways to prevent allergies from developing.

Read More

Thunderstorm asthma: be prepared

 Thunderstorm asthma: be prepared

Thunderstorm asthma occurs when there is a combination of a high rye grass pollen count and particular thunderstorm conditions. Epidemic thunderstorm asthma events, where many people develop asthma symptoms over a short space of time, are uncommon. Whole grass-pollen grains are usually too large to enter lung airways but can irritate the eyes, nose and throat, causing hay fever. Winds created in certain thunderstorms concentrate grass pollens at ground level. Some pollens burst open releasing tiny particles (allergens) small enough to be inhaled deep into the lungs. These allergens can trigger asthma symptoms such as wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and coughing. Epidemic thunderstorm asthma events don’t happen every year, but can occur during grass pollen season, typically October to December.

Read More

Flu vaccine, give it your best shot

Flu vaccine, give it your best shot

Flu season is a time of sharing (germs) and caring. If you’ve ever had seasonal influenza, you certainly wouldn’t want it again - or want to share it with friends and family. That’s where the caring bit comes in. Having an annual flu shot is your best protection against weeks of illness and recovery with the virus. Plus, by being vaccinated you may be saving the lives of others in your community. 2017 vaccines are available at Campaspe Family Practice now. 

Read More

Severe sunburn is on the rise: health authorities are worried

Severe sunburn is on the rise: health authorities are worried

Sunburn for some is as Aussie as budgie smugglers and Vegemite sangers. If you spent the summer holidays largely outdoors enjoying barbecues, lazy days at the beach or pool, watching sport, or gardening, you probably experienced some degree of sunburn. January is a peak time for extreme sunburn. Last month SunSmart reported a record number of Victorians had attended public hospital emergency departments with severe sunburn in 2017. Most of the 355 people treated were children and people in their 20s. With school starting for the year, it’s no time for complacency.

Read More